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Free electronic lab notebooks: Evernote and eCAT compared

The Personal version of  eCAT is primarily used by postdocs and graduate students who want an electronic lab notebook  tailored to lab work.  In this post I am going to try to unpick the details of what that means — what kinds of things can you do in eCAT that you can’t do in general purpose free ‘ELNs’ (which when you scratch the surface are usually note taking devices of one sort or another)?  As a way of getting at the answers I’ll compare the Personal version of eCAT with the most popular note-taking software, Evernote, which is  used by lots of scientists.

First, some  things the free versions of eCAT and Evernote have in common:

  1. They’re both online and accessible anywhere, anytime.
  2. They’re both used by scientists to record and manage data from their research.
  3. They’re both simple to use.

But here are four things eCAT has that Evernote doesn’t have, and which help make eCAT a great tool for lab scientists:

  1. eCAT “brings structure to your experiments automatically.  Since you are working with project folders you have your own experiments, and you also add protocols, and you add the data and you add whatever electronic stuff you get during the experiments to that folder.  So everything gets sorted by date and time.  It’s much more structure, automatically”.  (Andreas Johansson, Lund University).
  2. eCAT comes preloaded with templates specifically designed for capturing and recording different kinds of scientific research.  There is a generic experiment template, and there is also an  antibody template, a freezer box template, a protocol template, a construct template, etc.
  3. eCAT makes it dead simple to build records of your own design, so you can create structures that allow you to  to effectively capture the kind of research you are doing.
  4. eCAT lets you add files to records.  So for example you can attach a spreadsheet with numerical data relating to an experiment, and confocal images of data which is analyzed in the experiment, to the experiment record.

Those capabilities are pretty useful.  That’s why more and more postdocs and graduate students, like Matt Nicotra at the University of Pittsburgh, are turning to eCAT as an ideal tool for  organizing and managing their experimental data.  Watch Matt talking about how he uses eCAT in this video.

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/user/matt/matt.flv

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