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How to use experiment templates and other templates in an electronic lab notebook

Posted by Rory on December 15th, 2010 @ 9:56 am

Standard templates

eCAT has two kinds of templates.  First, there are about  50 standard templates (called classes) that come pre-loaded in eCAT.  Here are a couple of examples.  First, an experiment:

The experiment template is pretty straightforward.  It consists of seven text fields — method, objective, procedure, etc.

Here is another example, a freezer box this time.

This one gives you an idea of the range of fields you can have in eCAT, including text but here also string, barcode and reference.  You can also have lots of other kinds of fields, such as number, time, text box, etc.

Example Templates

eCAT also has example templates.  These are standard templates which have been filled in.   Here is part of the filled in experiment template

Some of the fields have been filled in with text, and a table has been created or inserted into one of the fields.

And here is the filled in freezer box template:

As with the experiment template, the fields have been filled in.

Creating your own templates

eCAT makes it easy to create your own templates.  You can do that by modifying an existing template, or by creating one from scratch with eCAT”s template builder — anyone can do it, no need for IT expertise!

Using templates

eCAT also makes it easy to use templates, both those that come preloaded in the system and those you create.  From the dashboard, select ‘Create New’, and then ‘Use Template’, as shown below

You will be taken to the following page which shows the templates in eCAT.

Click ‘Preview’ on the template you want, and the template will appear.  Then click ‘Copy Template’ at the top of the template and a new copy of the template will be created for you to work with.

How to import images from the dashboard and as a child record in an electronic lab notebook

Posted by Rory on October 18th, 2010 @ 10:18 am

Last week I looked at how to insert images into a record in the electronic lab notebook  eCAT.  This week I’ll look at two other ways of importing images into eCAT, from the dashboard and from the record page.

Importing images from the dashboard

To start, just click on the Import menu item and then on Image

You will be taken to the import page, which looks like this:

The import page

You can choose to import images from your local computer by uploading them to the server, or you can import from an attachment store that your administrator has defined for you.

Importing from your local computer

To import from a local file, click “Choose File” or “Browse” (the exact text depends on your browser) and then select the file you want to upload. eCAT supports a variety of image types. The standard common images types are all fully supported – JPEG, BMP, PNG, GIF etc. We also support a range of specific scientific types such as TIFF, Zeiss LSM, Zeiss ZVI, Delatvision, Biorad (.pic) and Metamorph (.stk).

Importing from the local computer

If you wish to remove a file you have selected for upload, then click the red cross beside the file name.

Importing from an attachment store

To import from an attachment store, click the “Import files from attachment stores” button. Then click in a text box that says “Click here to select an attachment”. The following screen will appear.Importing from an attachment store

Select a file to import from the attachment store, and then click “Insert” to add it to list of files to import. You can import more than one file from attachment stores at once by clicking the [+] button to the right of the text box saying “Click here to select an attachment”.

When you have image files selected from either the local computer or an attachment store, click “Import” to import the files. Some image types support a preview and allow selection of the size of thumbnail images you will see in your imported records. If the image type you are importing works this way then you will see a screen similar to the following:

Previewing an imported image

When you have finished selecting the image sizes, click “Save” to save your settings. You will be taken to the target record if you are importing more than one image, or to the record that you have imported if you have imported a single image.

Importing images as children of a record

When you are viewing a record, you can click the “Import” option in the Children section of the main menu on the left hand side.

This will import the image as a child record of the record currently being viewed.

How to teach biology, chemistry or physics with the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on September 27th, 2010 @ 11:53 am

People often associate electronic lab notebooks with research.  That’s not surprising since that’s mostly what they’re used for!  But there is also  growing interest in using electronic lab notebooks as teaching tools, in both  universities and secondary schools.  For example, Dave Lunt at the University of Hull has an excellent presentation on using ELNs for student research monitoring.  In this post I’m going to go through setting up eCAT for teaching a class in science subjects like biology, chemistry and physics.  We’ve made a video that covers the same ground, so if you’d rather watch the video, here it is!

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/tutorials/teaching/teaching.flv

The scenario

To make it practical, let’s use a real  scenario.  Say you’re teaching Biology 101.  You’ve got 20 students enrolled in the autumn semester.  As part of the course the students will be doing some exercises and also carrying out some experiments.  Some of these will involve group work, and some will be individual work, for assessment.  You want to use the electronic lab notebook as an environment where students can document experiments and carry out exercises, and you can see their work and comment on it.  You want some of the students’ work to be private — only you and each student have access to it.  And you want some of the work to be accessible more widely so that groups of students can work together.

Setting up eCAT

You can use either of the group versions of eCAT — Team Hosted, which Axiope hosts on our servers, or Install, which is installed on your server.  To get started you login as admin.

Both versions of eCAT come preloaded with a Projects folder and a Users folder. You’ll be using both of these folders.  Here a a few screenshots of eCAT illustrating some of the actions described below:

  1. To get started, click on the admin tab and then Users, and set up user accounts for the students who will be taking the class this semester/term.  When you do this each user will automatically get a home folder with their name; these will appear under the Users section of the record tree.
  2. When each user logs in, they can create whatever they want in their home folder and only they (and you the admin) can see it.
  3. Staying in the admin section, click on Groups.
  4. Create an All Users group, and add every user to this group.
  5. Create four working groups (we’ll call them Group A, Group B, Group C and Group D) with five students each; these are the groups that will be working together on experiments.
  6. Now go back to the record tree and, under Projects, create a new folder for Group A. To do this, click on “Create New” and then select “Create as Owner” after selecting the Folder class type. Call this folder, “Group A Materials”.
  7. Click on advanced Sharing, and give Group A view, edit, append and download permissions.
  8. Then create a child record under the Group A Materials folder – an Experiment.  But this time click on “Create as Parent”. Then also create a Document record in the same way.
  9. Do the same to create Materials folders and Experiment and Document records for Groups B, C and D.
  10. Now go back to the Record Tree, click  the Projects folder, and create a child folder called ‘Course materials’.
  11. Use this folder to place materials you want  people to look at.  For example, you may want to create a set of instructions for using eCAT during the course.  You can do this by creating a new document in this Course Materials folder.  You also can import pre-existing documents, spreadsheets and images, for example you could import an ‘Initial Materials’ document. Give all groups view permission for this folder so that they can see all the course work.

Using eCAT

It’s that simple!   eCATis now  set up and ready to go.  How you use it is of course up to you.  But here are some simple examples of the kinds of things you can do with the set up you now have in place.

  1. Document experiments.  Each individual student and each group can use the Experiment record that has been set up for the group to document their first experiment.  As shown below, the Experiment record already is divided into fields for Method, Procedure, Objective, Results, Discussion, Conclusion and Comments.  For the Group records, you may want to set up some standard procedures (see below for more on this) to ensure that things are well organized and recorded.  For example, you could have a rule that each time a member of a group makes an entry in a Group record they should place their initials by the entry.
  2. Comment on experiments.  As admin, you have edit permission on all the records that have been created.  So, you can comment on the experiments  the groups and the individuals carry out.  Just do this in the Comments field, and it will be clear that the comment has been made by you.
  3. Create new records.  You, individual students and groups can create new records, as needed, as the semester proceeds. You/they can create new experiment and document records.  You/they can also create other kinds of records from the more than 20 preexisting templates that eCAT comes with.  And both you and they can also create records of your own design using eCAT’s class creator function.
  4. Communicate.  You and the students can use eCAT to communicate about Biology 101.  You can send messages about assignments, deadlines, etc., and you can also create tasks.  In both cases these can be addressed to individuals or to groups, and in both cases you can include links to eCAT records, so for example you could send a message to Group A about a particular experiment they are working on with a note that you have made a comment on it, and you can link to the experiment in the message.

Instructing the class on how to use eCAT

At the start of the course you’ll want to introduce eCAT to the class.  There are various ways to do that, and you’ll probably want to use some combination of:

  1. Having everyone view the Getting started with eCAT video, on their own and/or as a class so that there is an opportunity for questions and discussion.
  2. Preparing some specific instructions covering how you have set eCAT up, how you plan to use it and standard procedures to follow, and making these available, e.g. in a powerpoint presentation (which can be attached to an eCAT record) or a document placed in eCAT.
  3. A demo of eCAT.

Getting eCAT ready for reuse next semester

Your eCAT  licenses are reusable.  So if you have 25 licenses, and a class of 20 – 25 students, you can keep reusing the licenses each time you have a new group of students.  So, when the semester is finished, you simply delete from the User list the students who have just finished the course, freeing up the licenses for the students in next semester’s course or another course.

Try for yourself

Now you’ve seen how it works; why not try eCAT yourself?  You can sign up for a 30 day free trial here.

How to organize your lab with the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on September 20th, 2010 @ 10:09 am

Background:  research in the lab

The electronic lab notebook eCAT can be configured in many ways.  One of the most common configurations is for the single lab, typically including a lab head, postdocs, students, support staff and possibly  visitors. In this post I’m going to show you a typical model for how to set up eCAT for a lab.  We’ve made a video that covers the same ground, so if you’d rather watch the video, here it is!

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/tutorials/research/research.flv

Lab information basically falls into two categories. First, there is public, i.e., lab-wide, information, such as protocols, supplies, reagants, etc. This can include research data that everyone should have access to. Second, there is information generated by one person and typically thought of as private, or at least only available to others at the discretion of the author. There is a third kind of information, research data related to activities of a group — I’ll consider that later.

Basic eCAT set up

Data in eCAT can be organised to look like this diagram  from Mike Shipston’s lab:

At the top level there are two folders for the two different kinds of information:  Users contains the “private” information, and Lab Resources contains the “public”, i.e., lab-wide, information.

Within the “Users” folder there is a subfolder for each lab member. The lab member can put whatever they want in there, but there will always be a set of folders named for the projects that person is working on, and within those project folders a set of experiment records for each of the experiments that person has done.

Within the “Lab Resources” folder there are subfolders for each of the different types of resource, such as protocols and molecular tools, and within those further subfolders, for examples constructs and oligos in molecular tools.

Sharing

One of the important aspects of this organization of information is the way sharing is set up.

By default, everyone can see inside the Users folder.

Within that folder, the permissions on the individual lab member’s folders are set so that only approved people can see what is in the folder and its children – the individual themselves, and perhaps the lab-head or other supervisor as well. Records below that, such as Projects and Experiments, are set to inherit permissions from their parent records – so they have the same permissions as the individual lab member’s folder.

The Lab Resources folder  does not come preloaded in eCAT and needs to be created. All subfolders of Lab Resources need to be viewable by everyone. Depending on how you want to run the lab, selected people or anyone in the lab will have permission to add records and edit records. For example, permissions on the the Constructs folder can be set so that anyone can add to it or edit records in it, while permission on  the Oligos folder can be set so that only a few users can add to it or edit records contained in it. Again, lower-level records are set to inherit their permissions from their parent record so that they have the same behaviour as is set at the higher level.

Groups

We’ve seen how eCAT can work with individual users. You can  use Groups to make sharing even simpler. For example, you may want to create a group for the members of the lab working on a specific Project.

You might want all the work for that Project to be placed in one folder, with any member of the group able to add records and edit records in that folder. In that case you’d establish a folder Project X in the Projects folder. And for permissions you would create an eCAT group with all the people working on project X in it, and set the Project X folder to give permission to that group to add and edit. An advantage of having the group is that you don’t have to set permissions for each individual.  When someone joins the lab or leaves you can simply  add them to the group or remove them from the group.

Customizing eCAT

So that’s an example of a structure you can use to get your lab working with eCAT. There are also various ways to customize eCAT so that it better fits your work pattern. One simple way to do that is to customize the Favorites menu on the Dashboard page.

The Dashboard lets you quickly see records you have been working on and the Favorites menu lets you filter the Dashboard. So clicking on “My Projects” shows you just the Projects you can see.

You can customize the Favorites menu by clicking on “Customize menus” in your Preferences. You are taken to a page which shows the classes in the system. For example, if you always work with Lab Protocols and want to be able to quickly see them, you can add them to your Favourites menu.  When you return to the Dashboard My Lab Protocols is now visible, and clicking on the My Lab Protocols link shows you just your protocols. This is just one example of how you can customize eCAT by using Preferences!

So that’s a quick overview of organizing lab research information in eCAT. eCAT is incredibly flexible, so an almost infiite variety of  variations are possible.  Why not sign up for a free trial and explore what set ups makes sense for your lab!

Permissions and sharing in the electronic lab notebook eCAT III: Setting up a project for multiple members of the group

Posted by Rory on August 23rd, 2010 @ 7:00 am

In the previous post and the one before that I covered the basics of the eCAT permissions system and explained how simple permissions work for individual eCAT users.  In this post I’m going to explain how you can set up a Project that multiple members of the lab can work on.  Again we will follow Sarah.  Only this time Sarah is not setting up an experiment  for herself, she is setting up a Project that will be worked on by some and possibly all other members of the lab.

To facilitate this, she sets the scene by not creating a new record directly from the Dashboard.  As we discoverd last time, when she does that the record goes directly into her personal user folder.  Instead she clicks on the Records tab and then on the Projects folder.  Then she clicks Create new, and selects Project.  And this time the project she creates (we’ll call it Group project) appears under the Projects folder.

To set the permissions for Group project, Sarah clicks on Sharing in the menu on the left.  This time she wants to access the full sharing settings, so when the Simple sharing screen appears

Sarah clicks on the ‘here’ link in the text at the top and accesses the full sharing screen for Group project:

This time by default Sarah has a full set of permissions for this record, and no other user — or group of users — has any permissions.  Sarah can then set whatever permissions she wants for each invidividual user.  Perhaps everone in the group will be given view permission, so they can all follow the progress of the project, and active participants will be given edit permission, but only Sarah, as the person managing the project, will have delete and sharing permission.

Since child records inherit the permissions of their parent, all the records that are created in this Project, e.g. experiments, antibodies, protocols, etc., will automatically have the same permissions as the ones Sarah set on the original Group project record.  That keeps things from getting confused.  But if Sarah — and only Sarah because in this case she has only given herself permission to set sharing permission — decides that it’s useful for any particular record that is created under Group Project to have a different set of permissions, then she can reset the permissions for that particular record.

So that’s it!  A quick overview of how to get started creating records in eCAT for your own use and for use by a group, and how to set permissions for those records.

Permissions and sharing in the electronic lab notebook eCAT II: simple permissions for individual eCAT users

Posted by Rory on August 19th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

As noted in the last post, the underlying principle of eCAT’s permissions system is that all records inherit the permissions their parent record has, unless the permissions on the record are reset.  With that in mind, let’s see what happens when a new user creates their first record in eCAT from the eCAT dashboard. You can do that in one of three ways:  by creating a new record, by importing a document, spreadsheet or image, or by creating a record from one of eCAT”s preexisting templates.  In all three cases, the new record will by default be created in your personal ‘user’ folder.  For example, when a new user called Sarah creates her first record, Experiment 1, it is automatically saved in her sarah folder, as shown below.

Like all records, the Experiment 1 record inherits its permissions by default from its parent record, which is the sarah folder. Like all user folders, by default’ sarah’ has all six permissions available in eCAT.  As noted in the previous post, these are:  view, append, edit,  delete, download, and sharing.   So, Experiment 1 has these permissions too, and Sarah can view the Experiment 1 record, edit it, delete it, etc.  Sarah doesn’t need to do anything to make this possible, it just happens automatically in eCAT.

But Sarah has more control that that — she can also change the permissions on Experiment 1 (and of course on other records she creates).  To do that she clicks on ‘sharing’ in the menu at the left of the screen and the following page appears:

By clicking the boxes in Step 1 she can give other eCAT users the ability to view Experiment 1, to edit it, to delete it or to set permissions for it.  And, using Step 2, she can decide which users have these permissions.  Its completely flexible, and well suited to actual lab practices.  For example, Sarah might decide to give view only permission to most members of the lab, and edit permission to another lab member she is working with on Experiment 1 and to the PI, so that the PI can make comments in Experiment 1.  And Sarah has this flexibility for all the records she creates.  If she does nothing they remain private.  But if she wants she can share a record, again in whatever way she wants.

In the next post I’m going to cover sharing and permissions for groups, and give an example of how a lab testing eCAT can set up a Project that multiple members of the lab can work on.

Getting started with the electronic lab notebook eCAT — it’s easy!

Posted by Rory on August 5th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

What’s the best way to get started with eCAT?

The two simplest things to do are (a) import some of your existing data, and (b) create new data in eCAT.  You can do both of these from eCAT’s dashboard, which looks like this:

To import existing data —  a word document, a spreadsheet, or an image — click ‘Import’ and choose what you would like to import, say a word document.  You will be given the option of browsing documents  stored on your computer, so just choose the document you want to select, and then click ‘import’.  The document you have selected is created in your personal space.  To view it simply click on the record with the name of the document and the document will appear, with the correct formatting, just as in the original word document.  You can then continue editing the document in eCAT.

Importing existing data is also covered in the following video

Importing documents, spreadsheets and images

Another way to get started is to create new data in eCAT.  That’s just as easy as importing data!  Again you start at the dashboard, and this time click ‘Create New’.  You will be given a list of types of record that come pre-loaded in eCAT, such as experiment, project, antibody, etc.  Just choose one — for example freezer — and a blank version of the record will appear

You can now begin to edit the record!

For more ideas on how to get started with eCAT, please take a look at the Getting started with eCAT video.

Familiar interfaces: Why the electronic lab notebook eCAT and Google Docs have similar dashboards

Posted by Rory on July 12th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

When we brought out  version 3.3 of eCAT last week we made the interface

look a lot like the Google Docs interface

Why?  We’re following the advice of our eCAT users! One eCAT user, Andreas Johansson at Lund University in Sweden,  made the point that:

If something is hard to get started with and easy to use a lot of people will just have a look at and never get around to starting the first experiment. The main reason I chose eCAT is because it’s really easy to get started with and use.

We want you to take advantage of  the extra functionality  eCAT offers without having to spend time finding your way around an unfamiliar system.  We know that a lot of labs are using Google Docs as a document sharing and group editing tool, so we thought it was the obvious model to look to when we decided to redesign eCAT’s interface.

The first thing you’ll want to do in eCAT  is either create a new record or import/upload an existing one.  In both Google Docs and eCAT you can do this at the top left.  Then across the top of the page in both Google Docs and eCAT there is a set of tabs giving you access to other things you can do.  And finally, they both give you a list of your recent records in the main body of the page — just like your email inbox.

Another feature  that people find useful in Google Docs is the template page

So, we’ve made a new template page in eCAT that, once again, is modeled on its Google Docs counterpart

So if you use Google Docs, you should find eCAT easy to get started with and use.

10 reasons to try an electronic lab notebook — eCAT version 3.3!

Posted by Rory on July 6th, 2010 @ 3:59 pm

We’re launching a new version of the electronic lab notebook eCAT today.  Why is version 3.3 special?

First, the new features:

  1. a familiar dashboard modelled on Google Docs
  2. the ability to import spreadsheets, images and documents with a couple of clicks
  3. an extensive set of useful templates — experiments, antibodies, CHiP extracts, protocols and many more
  4. a notifications system
  5. a complete series of brief  ‘how to’ videos, embedded on each page of the application, describing the actions you can do on that page.

Second, enhanced support for people interested in learning about electronic lab notebooks and testing eCAT:

  1. The electronic lab notebook blog, covering everything you want to know about electronic lab notebooks
  2. A series of tutorial videos — such as eCAT for PIsGoogle Docs and eCAT, Wikis and eCAT, Patent protection with eCAT, etc.  —  available on our website
  3. An automatic installer that makes it a breeze to set up an eCAT trial
  4. This eCAT blog,  discussing how to get the most out of eCAT and answering questions from users

Third, a growing number of forward looking PIs are adopting eCAT because it combines ease of use, flexibility and the ability to add structure to their research data and enhance collaboration in the lab.  Here’s what Professor Mike Shipston, Director of the Centre for Integrative Physiology at the University of Edinburgh, has to say:

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/user/shipston/shipston.flv