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How to set up a new lab with an electronic lab notebook

Posted by Rory on October 4th, 2010 @ 9:44 am

I recently  came across a great primer on how to set up and run a new lab.  It’s called How to set up a new life science lab without HHMI funding, and it was put together by some people at Dartmouth to welcome new faculty members.  Their recommendations are simple:

  • You’re the best postdoc you’ll have for many years; stay at the bench
  • Grow slowly and selectively
  • Hire a research associate who is a stable person and not too proud to help you be more productive
  • Submit grants early
  • Compartmentalize and plan your time
  • Balance novel and risky experiments with meat and potatoes
  • Attend just one meeting a year

Hmm, I thought, eCAT can help with each of those recommendations.  Here’s how.

Stay at the bench

Spending time at the bench is one thing when your main focus is your own research, quite another when you have all the responsibilities and commitments that come with setting up and running a lab.  To make time for research, you’ll need to be well organized and efficient in carrying out and  documenting your experiments.  And you’ll need to be in close touch with the research  everyone else in the lab is doing — you’re not on your own or supervising one or two people any longer, you’re leading a group.

An electronic lab notebook can help on both accounts.  Larry Gonzalez  at the University of Okhlahoma summarized nicely how eCAT helps both him and his lab get better organized:

“eCAT  helps keep me organized, and it’s very good at increasing my efficiency in documenting my research.  Myself or a research technician or a post doctoral fellow can generate a protocol and store it in eCAT.  We can create the data forms that can be filled out manually and entered during an experiment, and we can link to external files.  And if someone would prefer to use another program like Excel to generate spreadsheets instead of entering data into eCAT they can create a spreadsheet and we can link to that file, and its all kept together and organized well in eCAT.  And then when an experiment is completed we’re able to export the data to an external statistical data program for subsequent analysis.”

Grow slowly and selectively

An important benefit of a good electronic lab notebook is that it is flexible enough to grow as your lab grows.  In the most obvious way, it should be able to accomodate the addition of new lab members by making it easy to set up new accounts for them.  There are also less obvious things a good ELN can help with, like  having the ability to set up groups of users.   In eCAT you can set up an  ‘all users’ group, with permissions set on what records the members of the lab can view, what records they can edit, etc.  So you don’t have to set up a new permissions regime for each new person who comes into the lab; you just add them to the all users group and it happens automatically.

Another aspect of eCAT’s ability to help integrate new lab members easily is that, as Alex Swarbrick of the Garvan Institute in Sydney pointed out,

“Since everyone uses the same interface, it is easier for new people to understand the way the lab works and to pick up on projects.”

Hire a research associate to help you be more productive

Postdocs have to be self sufficient and multi-talented to survive, much less thrive, so working with someone else who helps manage you and your new lab may take some getting used to.  To develop a good relationship with a research associate and get the most out of them involves not only interpersonal skills; you also need to establish an environment where collaboration and communication takes place as naturally and as easily as possible.

Introducing an electronic lab notebook as the place where everyone in the lab documents and shares experimental data, as well as meeting notes, protocols and other information not only makes your life easier, it also makes your research associate’s life easier.  And that’s crucial because given the explosion in demands on your time that come with runnning your own lab, your productivity is now impacted by your research associate’s productivity.  If they are left to chase bits of information scattered around other people’s paper lab notebooks, in random disk drives, and on personal computers, a lot of their time is going to be wasted.

With an electronic lab notebook, your research associate can have access to all group records, and can set up structures for recording and organizing things like lab protocols that make it easy for them, and you, to find information.  Heather McClafferty, research associate to Mike Shipton at The University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Integrative Physiology, said after the lab had adopted eCAT:

“Having everything tied together under one resource, so results, protocols, constructs, where things are physically, having everything together under one system has just been perfect.”

Submit grants early

Submitting grants early requires organization.  That’s pretty obvious.  What may be less obvious is that organization becomes a bigger challenge, but can also bring bigger rewards, when you are at the head of a group, even a small one like your first lab.  Your research associate and your students can both be useful resources for preparing for grants:  carrying out preliminary research, finding data from previous projects, and researching and preparing applications.  They will do all this much more effectively with an electronic lab notebook.  With an ELN it is easier to share data and communicate about it, data from previous projects is archived and easily searchable, and when it comes time to prepare the application, (a) people are already working in the same integrated environment, and (b) the data needed to support the application is readily available for inclusion into it.

Compartmentalize and plan your time

The organization theme is obviously relevant here.  But how does an electronic lab notebook help?  First, an online ELN like eCAT is accessible 24/7 from any computer with a web browser.  That means you don’t have to set up a specific time to see what others in the lab have been doing.  No need to make an appointment to go over a student’s paper lab book.  Instead, as Alex Swarbrick says, “I can use eCAT to remind myself of recent experimental results without hassling someone in the lab.”  And Alex, and other eCAT users, are free to arrange their time in the way that suits them, rather than having to fit in with arbitrary schedules, or what’s convenient for others.  The result is more time to spend, and to allocate in the way you find most effective.

Balance novel and risky experiments with meat and potatoes

One of the benefits of a flexible ELN is that it allows you to structure your experiments, and those of others in the lab, in the way that best suits your research.  Mike Shipston at Edinburgh put it this way:

“The great thing about eCAT is it’s incredibly flexible in terms of how you can set it up.  For example each member of the lab has their own folders and puts their own experiments within that, but its every easy to put that information together.”

Having a structured record of your lab’s experiments — yours but also everyone elses — means that you are more likely to spot patterns, discrepancies, and problems.  And see the woods from the trees and develop a better sense of what’s risky and what’s meat and potatoes, and why.

Attend just one meeting a year

This is one bit of advice you almost certainly are not going to follow!  The reality is that you’re going to find yourself on the road quite a lot, whether it’s attending a conference or meeting collaborators about a grant proposal or work on a grant in progress.  With an online ELN like eCAT, you can stay in touch with the work that’s going on back in the lab because you can login over the internet and see what people having been doing, in the evening, between meetings, or whenever it suits you.  And with eCAT’s notifications system, you can send and receive messages about people’s research, and even put links to experiments and other records in the messages, which makes it easy to work collaboratively even when you’re on the other side of the world.  So if don’t follow this last bit of advice, and end up attending meetings regularly, with eCAT you will still be able to keep up with other aspects of your lab’s research.

How to teach biology, chemistry or physics with the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on September 27th, 2010 @ 11:53 am

People often associate electronic lab notebooks with research.  That’s not surprising since that’s mostly what they’re used for!  But there is also  growing interest in using electronic lab notebooks as teaching tools, in both  universities and secondary schools.  For example, Dave Lunt at the University of Hull has an excellent presentation on using ELNs for student research monitoring.  In this post I’m going to go through setting up eCAT for teaching a class in science subjects like biology, chemistry and physics.  We’ve made a video that covers the same ground, so if you’d rather watch the video, here it is!

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/tutorials/teaching/teaching.flv

The scenario

To make it practical, let’s use a real  scenario.  Say you’re teaching Biology 101.  You’ve got 20 students enrolled in the autumn semester.  As part of the course the students will be doing some exercises and also carrying out some experiments.  Some of these will involve group work, and some will be individual work, for assessment.  You want to use the electronic lab notebook as an environment where students can document experiments and carry out exercises, and you can see their work and comment on it.  You want some of the students’ work to be private — only you and each student have access to it.  And you want some of the work to be accessible more widely so that groups of students can work together.

Setting up eCAT

You can use either of the group versions of eCAT — Team Hosted, which Axiope hosts on our servers, or Install, which is installed on your server.  To get started you login as admin.

Both versions of eCAT come preloaded with a Projects folder and a Users folder. You’ll be using both of these folders.  Here a a few screenshots of eCAT illustrating some of the actions described below:

  1. To get started, click on the admin tab and then Users, and set up user accounts for the students who will be taking the class this semester/term.  When you do this each user will automatically get a home folder with their name; these will appear under the Users section of the record tree.
  2. When each user logs in, they can create whatever they want in their home folder and only they (and you the admin) can see it.
  3. Staying in the admin section, click on Groups.
  4. Create an All Users group, and add every user to this group.
  5. Create four working groups (we’ll call them Group A, Group B, Group C and Group D) with five students each; these are the groups that will be working together on experiments.
  6. Now go back to the record tree and, under Projects, create a new folder for Group A. To do this, click on “Create New” and then select “Create as Owner” after selecting the Folder class type. Call this folder, “Group A Materials”.
  7. Click on advanced Sharing, and give Group A view, edit, append and download permissions.
  8. Then create a child record under the Group A Materials folder – an Experiment.  But this time click on “Create as Parent”. Then also create a Document record in the same way.
  9. Do the same to create Materials folders and Experiment and Document records for Groups B, C and D.
  10. Now go back to the Record Tree, click  the Projects folder, and create a child folder called ‘Course materials’.
  11. Use this folder to place materials you want  people to look at.  For example, you may want to create a set of instructions for using eCAT during the course.  You can do this by creating a new document in this Course Materials folder.  You also can import pre-existing documents, spreadsheets and images, for example you could import an ‘Initial Materials’ document. Give all groups view permission for this folder so that they can see all the course work.

Using eCAT

It’s that simple!   eCATis now  set up and ready to go.  How you use it is of course up to you.  But here are some simple examples of the kinds of things you can do with the set up you now have in place.

  1. Document experiments.  Each individual student and each group can use the Experiment record that has been set up for the group to document their first experiment.  As shown below, the Experiment record already is divided into fields for Method, Procedure, Objective, Results, Discussion, Conclusion and Comments.  For the Group records, you may want to set up some standard procedures (see below for more on this) to ensure that things are well organized and recorded.  For example, you could have a rule that each time a member of a group makes an entry in a Group record they should place their initials by the entry.
  2. Comment on experiments.  As admin, you have edit permission on all the records that have been created.  So, you can comment on the experiments  the groups and the individuals carry out.  Just do this in the Comments field, and it will be clear that the comment has been made by you.
  3. Create new records.  You, individual students and groups can create new records, as needed, as the semester proceeds. You/they can create new experiment and document records.  You/they can also create other kinds of records from the more than 20 preexisting templates that eCAT comes with.  And both you and they can also create records of your own design using eCAT’s class creator function.
  4. Communicate.  You and the students can use eCAT to communicate about Biology 101.  You can send messages about assignments, deadlines, etc., and you can also create tasks.  In both cases these can be addressed to individuals or to groups, and in both cases you can include links to eCAT records, so for example you could send a message to Group A about a particular experiment they are working on with a note that you have made a comment on it, and you can link to the experiment in the message.

Instructing the class on how to use eCAT

At the start of the course you’ll want to introduce eCAT to the class.  There are various ways to do that, and you’ll probably want to use some combination of:

  1. Having everyone view the Getting started with eCAT video, on their own and/or as a class so that there is an opportunity for questions and discussion.
  2. Preparing some specific instructions covering how you have set eCAT up, how you plan to use it and standard procedures to follow, and making these available, e.g. in a powerpoint presentation (which can be attached to an eCAT record) or a document placed in eCAT.
  3. A demo of eCAT.

Getting eCAT ready for reuse next semester

Your eCAT  licenses are reusable.  So if you have 25 licenses, and a class of 20 – 25 students, you can keep reusing the licenses each time you have a new group of students.  So, when the semester is finished, you simply delete from the User list the students who have just finished the course, freeing up the licenses for the students in next semester’s course or another course.

Try for yourself

Now you’ve seen how it works; why not try eCAT yourself?  You can sign up for a 30 day free trial here.

How to organize your lab with the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on September 20th, 2010 @ 10:09 am

Background:  research in the lab

The electronic lab notebook eCAT can be configured in many ways.  One of the most common configurations is for the single lab, typically including a lab head, postdocs, students, support staff and possibly  visitors. In this post I’m going to show you a typical model for how to set up eCAT for a lab.  We’ve made a video that covers the same ground, so if you’d rather watch the video, here it is!

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/tutorials/research/research.flv

Lab information basically falls into two categories. First, there is public, i.e., lab-wide, information, such as protocols, supplies, reagants, etc. This can include research data that everyone should have access to. Second, there is information generated by one person and typically thought of as private, or at least only available to others at the discretion of the author. There is a third kind of information, research data related to activities of a group — I’ll consider that later.

Basic eCAT set up

Data in eCAT can be organised to look like this diagram  from Mike Shipston’s lab:

At the top level there are two folders for the two different kinds of information:  Users contains the “private” information, and Lab Resources contains the “public”, i.e., lab-wide, information.

Within the “Users” folder there is a subfolder for each lab member. The lab member can put whatever they want in there, but there will always be a set of folders named for the projects that person is working on, and within those project folders a set of experiment records for each of the experiments that person has done.

Within the “Lab Resources” folder there are subfolders for each of the different types of resource, such as protocols and molecular tools, and within those further subfolders, for examples constructs and oligos in molecular tools.

Sharing

One of the important aspects of this organization of information is the way sharing is set up.

By default, everyone can see inside the Users folder.

Within that folder, the permissions on the individual lab member’s folders are set so that only approved people can see what is in the folder and its children – the individual themselves, and perhaps the lab-head or other supervisor as well. Records below that, such as Projects and Experiments, are set to inherit permissions from their parent records – so they have the same permissions as the individual lab member’s folder.

The Lab Resources folder  does not come preloaded in eCAT and needs to be created. All subfolders of Lab Resources need to be viewable by everyone. Depending on how you want to run the lab, selected people or anyone in the lab will have permission to add records and edit records. For example, permissions on the the Constructs folder can be set so that anyone can add to it or edit records in it, while permission on  the Oligos folder can be set so that only a few users can add to it or edit records contained in it. Again, lower-level records are set to inherit their permissions from their parent record so that they have the same behaviour as is set at the higher level.

Groups

We’ve seen how eCAT can work with individual users. You can  use Groups to make sharing even simpler. For example, you may want to create a group for the members of the lab working on a specific Project.

You might want all the work for that Project to be placed in one folder, with any member of the group able to add records and edit records in that folder. In that case you’d establish a folder Project X in the Projects folder. And for permissions you would create an eCAT group with all the people working on project X in it, and set the Project X folder to give permission to that group to add and edit. An advantage of having the group is that you don’t have to set permissions for each individual.  When someone joins the lab or leaves you can simply  add them to the group or remove them from the group.

Customizing eCAT

So that’s an example of a structure you can use to get your lab working with eCAT. There are also various ways to customize eCAT so that it better fits your work pattern. One simple way to do that is to customize the Favorites menu on the Dashboard page.

The Dashboard lets you quickly see records you have been working on and the Favorites menu lets you filter the Dashboard. So clicking on “My Projects” shows you just the Projects you can see.

You can customize the Favorites menu by clicking on “Customize menus” in your Preferences. You are taken to a page which shows the classes in the system. For example, if you always work with Lab Protocols and want to be able to quickly see them, you can add them to your Favourites menu.  When you return to the Dashboard My Lab Protocols is now visible, and clicking on the My Lab Protocols link shows you just your protocols. This is just one example of how you can customize eCAT by using Preferences!

So that’s a quick overview of organizing lab research information in eCAT. eCAT is incredibly flexible, so an almost infiite variety of  variations are possible.  Why not sign up for a free trial and explore what set ups makes sense for your lab!

The eCAT electronic lab notebook: a time saving technology for labs

Posted by Rory on September 14th, 2010 @ 8:51 pm

Last week eCAT was featured in an article called Time Saving Technology in the Nexxus News Autumn 2010 edition. The other companies featured in the article were:

  1. Actual Analytics, whose technology takes video footage of animals used in scientific research and automatically identifies specific behaviors.  This ensures that data about the animals is captured in an objective fashion, improving the quality of the data on which decisions are made, and significantly reducing the time involved.
  2. Lab901, whose ScreenTape provides a fast solution for automated electrophoresis of DNA, RNA and proteins.

Actual Analytics is about more efficient data capture, and Lab901 is about automated, hence faster, data processing.  The time saving element of each of these solutions is pretty obvious, more or less self evident.  Lab901, for example, says that “On multiple protein and antibody analysis, SDS-PAGE and full analysis can be completed within minutes instead of hours.”  The ROI is readily quantifiable there.  But what about eCAT?  Why did the folks at Nexxus(the Scottish life sciences networking group) decide to include an electronic lab notebook in the company of these two time saving technologies for labs?  I asked Kate Fink, and here’s what she said:

“One of the most consistent things we hear from people and small science businesses is how incredibly busy they are.  Something that saves them time can be a huge benefit . . . so I thought the article could be useful to them . . .  Turns out what tied the [three companies] together to form a cohesive article was their ability to improve efficiency.”

ROI on electronic lab notebooks

It’s a lot harder to quantify the efficiency gains which result when a lab adopts an electronic lab notebook than with the Actual Analytics and Lab901 examples.  Yes, some vendors have done studies concluding that in pharma labs which have adopted an ELN scientists produce and analyze the same amount of data in 80% of the time.   But without being involved in the study it’s hard to know how accurate these conclusions are, and in any event this kind of analysis is not that relevant to PIs in academia, who just don’t think about their labs or their students in these terms.

Decision making in academic labs

So what’s different about academic labs? Here’s a hypothesis:  it has to do with the decision making process.  In pharma labs, although the scientists may be consulted about the possible adoption of an electronic lab notebook, at the end of the day the decision is made by managers and supervisors, not scientists.  Once the decision has been made, training and mentoring will be provided to make the adoption process as painless as possible, but the scientists have no choice but to learn how to use the new system.

In most academic labs, it doesn’t work that way.  Many academic labs are really collections of individual researchers.  In these cases the decision whether or not to adopt an ELN is likely to be truly democratic and collective.  In other cases the PI exercises greater control and there is more of an orientation towards common research.  Even in these cases, however, it’s highly unlikely that the PI will make a unilateral decision about adopting an ELN.  It may be a managed decision, but there will still be strong collective input.

Joshua Shaevitz at Princeton makes the point that “the whole lab has to seriously embrace the new use of technology or the system will fail. Before implementing our wiki system, I setup a mock wiki ELN on my laptop and presented it during lab meeting to show everyone the benefits firsthand. I especially wanted to convince them that the new system would not generate extra work, but would instead make their lives easier.”

Academic labs:  ROI on the process of adoption

This means that for academic labs a key consideration in thinking about ELNs has tobe the the ROI on the process of adoption.  It’s fine to think about the productivity gains — for both individuals and the lab — that will come after the ELN has been adopted.  But these are a pipe dream unless adoption takes place in the first place.  And PIs know that adoption is not going to be easy.  A scientist in a regenerative medicine lab pointed out a typical attitude when he said:

“What amazes me is how little lumpiness there has to be in the use of something for everyone not to want to use it.”

With that attitude to adopting new tools so prevalent in academic labs, PIs know that it will be highly unproductive to attempt to coax, much less coerce, lab members into adopting an electronic lab notebook unless it not only is easy to use but also is easy to learn to use.

Electronic lab notebooks: easier than you think!

Electronic lab notebooks are often perceived to be hard to use, difficult, non-intuitive, and/or things which are only used in commercial settings.  That perception is itself a barrier, but it’s not necessarily a difficult barrier to overcome — with appropriate supporting evidence! — and hence need not be a big drag on the adoption process.  The comment made by Professor Mike Shipston at Edinburgh University (a PI) that

“It was a major surprise; transferring to an electronic lab notebook is actually very easy.”

captures both the typical perception that ELNs are difficult and the reality that adoption of  (in this case) eCAT was very easy.  Andreas Johansson at Lund University (a graduate student), makes the additional point that being easy to get started with eCAT makes it easier to encourage adoption among the lab as a whole:

“The main reason I chose eCAT is because it’s really easy to get started with and use.  If something is hard to get started with and easy to use a lot of people will just have a look at and never get around to starting the first experiment.  eCAT is easy to use; it also means I can ask my colleagues to use it as well.”

Electronic lab notebooks:  a time saving device whose time has come?

I have to say that even I was surprised recently when a new eCAT user, starting from scratch with no prior training or coaching, and completely on his own, created and filled out more than 40 new records, many of which he designed himself, in less than two days, involving only a few hours of work!  When word gets around about experiences like that, perceptions are bound to change, and that means a lower barrier to adoption and a higher ROI on the adoption process.  That’s good news if you’re a PI who is considering adopting a PI for your lab — time saved during the adoption process and time saved once adoption has taken place.

Notifications in the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on September 6th, 2010 @ 9:03 am

Increasingly electronic lab notebooks are about more than just recording experimental data.   They are tools, platforms, environments — call them what you will — that support collaboration among groups of scientists.  Sometimes those scientists are in the same lab or at least the same building.  Sometimes they are spread out around the world.  Regardless of the number of people involved and their locations, productive collaboration is not possible without effective communication.  So the new breed of ELNs needs to include good mechanisms for communicating.

With this in mind, Version 3.3 of eCAT, which was released in July, has a new notifications system.  It’s designed to be

  • simple
  • easy to use
  • closely integrated with eCAT’s collaborative research capabilities

A simple system

There are two kinds of notifications in eCAT — messages and tasks — and they are exceedingly simple.  They look just like emails, and in fact they are  kind of an  email system which is internal to eCAT.

Easy to use

The notifications tab appears at the top of each eCAT page.  To send a message or a task, you start by clicking on the notifications tab.  Then you choose create task or create message.  If you choose create message the following screen appears:

Then enter who you want to send your message to — one or more members of the group you are working with — fill in the subject, compose your message and press send.  Pretty simple — just like an email.  And a red flag will appear on each recipient’s notifications tab, so they know that there is a new message waiting for them to read.

Enhances research collaboration

So far so simple and easy, but the neatest thing is how notifications in eCAT integrate with the rest of eCAT.  To see how that works let’s look at another screenshot, this time of a task which has been composed and is about to be sent:

You will see that there is a link to the mouse colony experiment, the experiment I want Nigel, Jonathan, and Leigh to comment on.  And actually this is a record like other eCAT records, so you have the full power of eCAT’s editor at your disposal in composing this task.  In addition to making a link to the mouse colony experiment, you could have linked to web pages, inserted images, included more complicated formatting, etc.  So you’re able not just to send isolated messages, but to create messages and tasks which are tightly integrated with the work you and your colleagues are doing. eCAT provides an integrated environment for collaboration and communicating about that collaboration.  That’s useful when, as in this example, you are doing joint research.  It’s also useful for instructors who are using eCAT as a teaching tool.  You can send messages and set tasks for an individual student, a group of students, or the whole class.  And, with tasks, as shown in the above screenshot, you can set priorities and due dates.

So there’s an introduction to eCAT’s notifications system, and how it can help you and your group enhance your collaboration through better communication.

Free electronic lab notebooks: Evernote and eCAT compared

Posted by Rory on September 2nd, 2010 @ 9:19 am

The Personal version of  eCAT is primarily used by postdocs and graduate students who want an electronic lab notebook  tailored to lab work.  In this post I am going to try to unpick the details of what that means — what kinds of things can you do in eCAT that you can’t do in general purpose free ‘ELNs’ (which when you scratch the surface are usually note taking devices of one sort or another)?  As a way of getting at the answers I’ll compare the Personal version of eCAT with the most popular note-taking software, Evernote, which is  used by lots of scientists.

First, some  things the free versions of eCAT and Evernote have in common:

  1. They’re both online and accessible anywhere, anytime.
  2. They’re both used by scientists to record and manage data from their research.
  3. They’re both simple to use.

But here are four things eCAT has that Evernote doesn’t have, and which help make eCAT a great tool for lab scientists:

  1. eCAT “brings structure to your experiments automatically.  Since you are working with project folders you have your own experiments, and you also add protocols, and you add the data and you add whatever electronic stuff you get during the experiments to that folder.  So everything gets sorted by date and time.  It’s much more structure, automatically”.  (Andreas Johansson, Lund University).
  2. eCAT comes preloaded with templates specifically designed for capturing and recording different kinds of scientific research.  There is a generic experiment template, and there is also an  antibody template, a freezer box template, a protocol template, a construct template, etc.
  3. eCAT makes it dead simple to build records of your own design, so you can create structures that allow you to  to effectively capture the kind of research you are doing.
  4. eCAT lets you add files to records.  So for example you can attach a spreadsheet with numerical data relating to an experiment, and confocal images of data which is analyzed in the experiment, to the experiment record.

Those capabilities are pretty useful.  That’s why more and more postdocs and graduate students, like Matt Nicotra at the University of Pittsburgh, are turning to eCAT as an ideal tool for  organizing and managing their experimental data.  Watch Matt talking about how he uses eCAT in this video.

http://www.axiope.com/electronic-lab-notebook/video/ecat_3.3.0/user/matt/matt.flv

Getting started with the electronic lab notebook eCAT — it’s easy!

Posted by Rory on August 5th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

What’s the best way to get started with eCAT?

The two simplest things to do are (a) import some of your existing data, and (b) create new data in eCAT.  You can do both of these from eCAT’s dashboard, which looks like this:

To import existing data —  a word document, a spreadsheet, or an image — click ‘Import’ and choose what you would like to import, say a word document.  You will be given the option of browsing documents  stored on your computer, so just choose the document you want to select, and then click ‘import’.  The document you have selected is created in your personal space.  To view it simply click on the record with the name of the document and the document will appear, with the correct formatting, just as in the original word document.  You can then continue editing the document in eCAT.

Importing existing data is also covered in the following video

Importing documents, spreadsheets and images

Another way to get started is to create new data in eCAT.  That’s just as easy as importing data!  Again you start at the dashboard, and this time click ‘Create New’.  You will be given a list of types of record that come pre-loaded in eCAT, such as experiment, project, antibody, etc.  Just choose one — for example freezer — and a blank version of the record will appear

You can now begin to edit the record!

For more ideas on how to get started with eCAT, please take a look at the Getting started with eCAT video.

4 things postdocs and graduate students like about the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on July 22nd, 2010 @ 7:00 am

Last time some PIs told us what they like about eCAT.  This time its the turn of postdocs and graduate students.

  1. The thing I like best about eCAT is it’s very simple to use.  I looked at some other electronic lab notebooks and they were complicated or overly designed.  eCAT has a very simple interface.  It’s very flexible so I can just go in and immediately start writing my lab notebook the way I used to with a paper lab notebook.  It’s simple, I don’t have to spend any time figuring it out.” (Matt Nicotra, University of Pittsburgh).
  2. “It also brings structure to your experiments automatically.  Since you are working with project folders you have your own experiments, and you also add protocols, and you add the data and you add whatever electronic stuff you get during the experiments to that folder.  So everything gets sorted by date and time.  It’s much more structure, automatically. (Andreas Johansson, Lund University)
  3. “Members of our labs are starting to realize the power of allowing them to more natively integrate electronic sources of data (documents, images, web links, etc.), which was not something readily accomplished with a paper notebook.” (Morten Jensen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Hoang Pham, Lawrence Berkeley Labs)
  4. “The great thing that we saw in eCAT was a system that could be suited to varying needs as they change over time. It had a nice architecture in place that could be well suited to our needs right now, but also one that was flexible enough to handle all kinds of different data needs as they emerge in the future.” (Trevor Covert, Washington State University)

Why not see for yourself?  Sign up for a  free trial of the Team Hosted or Install versions of eCAT, or get your own free Personal account!

Familiar interfaces: Why the electronic lab notebook eCAT and Google Docs have similar dashboards

Posted by Rory on July 12th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

When we brought out  version 3.3 of eCAT last week we made the interface

look a lot like the Google Docs interface

Why?  We’re following the advice of our eCAT users! One eCAT user, Andreas Johansson at Lund University in Sweden,  made the point that:

If something is hard to get started with and easy to use a lot of people will just have a look at and never get around to starting the first experiment. The main reason I chose eCAT is because it’s really easy to get started with and use.

We want you to take advantage of  the extra functionality  eCAT offers without having to spend time finding your way around an unfamiliar system.  We know that a lot of labs are using Google Docs as a document sharing and group editing tool, so we thought it was the obvious model to look to when we decided to redesign eCAT’s interface.

The first thing you’ll want to do in eCAT  is either create a new record or import/upload an existing one.  In both Google Docs and eCAT you can do this at the top left.  Then across the top of the page in both Google Docs and eCAT there is a set of tabs giving you access to other things you can do.  And finally, they both give you a list of your recent records in the main body of the page — just like your email inbox.

Another feature  that people find useful in Google Docs is the template page

So, we’ve made a new template page in eCAT that, once again, is modeled on its Google Docs counterpart

So if you use Google Docs, you should find eCAT easy to get started with and use.