Where sample management meets electronic lab notebook



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Getting started with the electronic lab notebook eCAT — it’s easy!

Posted by Rory on August 5th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

What’s the best way to get started with eCAT?

The two simplest things to do are (a) import some of your existing data, and (b) create new data in eCAT.  You can do both of these from eCAT’s dashboard, which looks like this:

To import existing data —  a word document, a spreadsheet, or an image — click ‘Import’ and choose what you would like to import, say a word document.  You will be given the option of browsing documents  stored on your computer, so just choose the document you want to select, and then click ‘import’.  The document you have selected is created in your personal space.  To view it simply click on the record with the name of the document and the document will appear, with the correct formatting, just as in the original word document.  You can then continue editing the document in eCAT.

Importing existing data is also covered in the following video

Importing documents, spreadsheets and images

Another way to get started is to create new data in eCAT.  That’s just as easy as importing data!  Again you start at the dashboard, and this time click ‘Create New’.  You will be given a list of types of record that come pre-loaded in eCAT, such as experiment, project, antibody, etc.  Just choose one — for example freezer — and a blank version of the record will appear

You can now begin to edit the record!

For more ideas on how to get started with eCAT, please take a look at the Getting started with eCAT video.

Adding structure to your research with databases in the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on August 2nd, 2010 @ 7:00 am

In the last post I talked about various ways of making use of templates in eCAT.  In this post I’d like to touch on a way in which you can add another layer of structure to research data in eCAT — databases.

eCAT makes it easy to construct databases — this happens automatically when you add links between records.  eCAT comes preloaded with three example databases.  Let’s take a brief look at two of them to get an idea of the kinds of databases you might want to create in eCAT.

The first example

shows how a series of records can be linked togethe rin eCAT  to manage inventory.  Each of the items in green represents a different class of record in eCAT.  Boxes (Freezer, Shipping) contain bidirectional links to the items stored in them, in this case Antibodies. Freezer Boxes also are linked to their storage container, in this case Freezer. The Shipping Box class is not contained in a Freezer, but does have a link to an external Internet URL – the tracking website for the courier company. This database comes with built-in documentation in records of class Documentation Page, which contain links to all the different classes used in the database.

In the second example

the Experiment records contain links to Lab Protocols, Mutagenic Oligos, etc. Other classes are generally not linked, but Project records are connected in a parent-daughter manner to Experiments.  So, Professor Mike Shipston lab at Ednburgh University is able to record its experimental data in a single integrated environment, with multiple links to other data the lab deals with such as protocols, constructs and oligos.

Databases for managing inventory and integrating your experiments in the broader context of your lab’s research are just two of the virtually infinite ways in which you can organize your data in eCAT.  Its this kind of flexibility that leads to comments like the following from Mike Shipston:

“The great thing about the eCAT electronic lab notebook is, its incredibly flexible in terms of how you can set it up.”

4 ways to get the most out of templates with the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on July 29th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

Version 3.3 of eCAT, which was released on July 8, comes pre-loaded with more than 20 templates.  Here are four ways to make good use of them:

  1. Get an idea for how other scientists are using eCAT.
  2. Understand the wide range of information that eCAT can help you to manage,  from experimental data to protocols to freezer samples to meeting notes to CHiP extracts to constructs to records about lab personnel and equipment.
  3. Grab a template for your own use; by clicking the “Copy Template” button at the top of the template, you will create an editable copy of the template in your home folder.
  4. Make a blank version of the template; clicking the “Create New” button at the top of the template will create a blank version of the template with the fields not filled in.

Using the electronic lab notebook eCAT as a replacement for a paper lab notebook

Posted by Rory on July 26th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

Wikipedia defines electronic lab notebook as “a software program designed to replace paper lab notebooks“.  So how can you use eCAT to replace something that looks like this?

Let’s look at this question first from the individual’s point of view and then from the lab’s point of view.  Here’s what Andreas Johansson of Lund University in Sweden says:

“I use eCAT for everything in the laboratory when I need to make a note of anything.  I use it for my experiments and my protocols.  But I also use it for things I didn’t use it for before I had an electronic lab notebook.  I use it for digital photos, so protein gels, screenshots of my HPC runs, screenshots of the small things I see during my experiment.  Before I would have just made a small note about it, now I have a photo of it.  And I also add time stamps during an experiment so I can easily see at what point I did a certain thing.

The main result is very very large quality improvements.  It also brings structure to your experiments automatically.  Since you are working with project folders you have your own experiments, and you also add protocols, and you add the data and you add whatever electronic stuff you get during the experiments to that folder.  So everything gets sorted by date and time.

And here’s what Alex Swarbrick at the Garvan Institute in Sydney, Australia says about his lab’s use of eCAT:

Everyone uses it as an electronic notebook, so they can compile the diverse collections of data that we generate as biologists, such as images and spreadsheets. We use to it to take minutes of meetings. We also use it to manage our common stocks of antibodies, plasmids and so on. Finally, perhaps the most important feature for us is the ability to link records, reagents and experiments. This allows us, for example, to connect an experimental mouse with the tube containing its tissues in the freezer, to the 6 different experiments (conducted over a year) that analysed those tissues in different ways. Managing this kind of ‘metadata’ is absolutely essential to our work, and very difficult to do without tools like eCAT.”

Of the many benefits of using eCAT as an electronic lab notebook noted by Andreas and Alex, three are worth highlighting:

  1. eCAT serves as  a ‘paper lab notebook plus’ because you can use it to record not only garden variety experimental data but also things like images and spreadsheets which can’t conveniently be entered into a paper lab notebook.
  2. eCAT allows you to manage other kinds of information such as notes from meetings, protocols and inventory, as well as experimental data, in a single, integrated environment.
  3. Unlike a paper lab notebook, which by definition is a tool for individuals, eCAT is a group tool that allows controlled  sharing of data.

4 Things PIs like about the electronic lab notebook eCAT

Posted by Rory on July 19th, 2010 @ 7:00 am

Today I thought I’d let some PIs who are using eCAT in their labs speak for themselves about eCAT.  Here are four things they like about it:

  1. “The great thing about eCAT is, it’s incredibly flexible in terms of how you can set it up. For example each member of the lab has their own folders and puts their own experiments within that, but it’s every easy to put that information together.” (Mike Shipston, Edinburgh University)
  2. “Perhaps the most important feature for us is the ability to link records, reagents and experiments. This allows us, for example, to connect an experimental mouse with the tube containing its tissues in the freezer, to the 6 different experiments (conducted over a year) that analysed those tissues in different ways. Managing this kind of ‘metadata’ is absolutely essential to our work, and very difficult to do without tools like eCAT.” (Alex Swarbrick, Garvan Institute)
  3. “With eCAT we were able to organize all our projects and materials, and create an integrated and searchable database of our work.” (Michael Shtutman, Ordway Institute)
  4. “Because it’s accessible over the internet eCAT is easy to view, from my office or my lab, or at home.” (Larry Gonzalez, University of Oklahoma)

Why not sign up for a free trial and find out how eCAT can help you keep your lab and your research data organized?