7 Things to consider before adopting an electronic lab notebook for your lab

Posted by Rory on September 16th, 2010 @ 8:43 am

Adopting an electronic lab notebook for your lab is not a decision to be taken lightly. It will take time and effort on your part and is likely to meet with mixed reactions from other lab members — delight/relief from some but also suspicion/hesitancy from others.  It will involve at least some changes in working practices for everyone. So, what things should you consider before you begin the process of looking at what’s out there and what kind of ELN suits you and your lab?

1.  You!

There’s no better place to start with than yourself.  Lab heads/PIs who successfully introduce ELNs in their labs tend to be:

  • Comfortable with computers and software
  • Not afraid to try out new software applications
  • Strong leaders within their labs
  • Well organized
  • Interested in improving collaboration within the lab
  • Interested in the benefits deriving from the lab working together more effectively as a group, such as more research data being captured and archived in a way that it can be found and used in the future.

2.  Other lab members

Let’s assume you’re ready to drive the process of adopting an ELN, but what about the rest of the lab?  There are a couple of things to consider here.  First, are there one or two lab members who are likely to be positive about adopting an ELN and prepared to help you with testing a system and rolling it out?    You will want to test the ELN yourself, but you probably will not want to do all the work involved in bringing others up to speed.  So someone — a research technician, a lab admin person, or just an enthusiast — who is willing to take on that role could be invaluable.  Second, what is the range of attitudes to ELNs among the lab members?  If the general attitude is neutral to positive, you’re in good shape, but if there are significant pockets of resistance you and your ‘allies’ will need to work out a strategy for bringing the sceptics along, e.g. by pairing them up with a mentor.

3.  IT infrastructure

In addition to considering the people side of your lab, you need to consider the IT environment. Do you have a computer system which is reliable and available to host the ELN?  If not, are you or your department in a position to purchase a new computer to host the ELN?

4.  IT support

How good is your IT support and how good is your relationship with them?  Are they available and happy to help with installing the ELN?  If the answer to this question or the previous one  is no, you may want to consider adopting an ELN which is hosted by the provider, who will take care of the system and backup.

5.  Your lab’s data

What kind of data does your lab deal in?  Do you have lots of images?  Where is the data currently stored and how is it managed?  Do you have a shared file system?   Do lab members use paper lab notebooks for experimental data?  You will need to think about these issues because the ELN you adopt will need to be integrated with your data storage set up, and will require some changes in data management, e.g. experimental data can now be kept in the ELN rather than spread around in everyone’s individual paper labbooks.

6.  Lab working practices

Adopting an ELN may prove to be a lot easier than you imagined (or feared!), but it still is going to require some changes of working practices in the lab.  So it would be useful to think about just what current working practices are, and what areas can be improved by adoption of the ELN.  For one thing, with everyone working in the same online environment there is a lot of scope for (a) increased flexibility, and (b) better and more focussed collaboration.  as an example of flexibility, you will  no longer need to arrange a specific time to look at individual paper labbooks, instead you can view and comment on experiments lab members are working on anytime, from anywhere, when you’re at home in the evening or away at a conference.  Adopting an ELN also opens up new ways of collaborating and communicating about research.  Of course people will still chat at the bench or around the coffee machine.  But with an ELN a particular group can work on documenting a single experiment or a broader project together, again from anywhere, any time and if you like other lab members can be given view (but not edit) permission on the experiment or project, so that they can follow the course of the group’s work.

7.  Timing

Last but certainly not least, you’ll want to introduce the ELN at a time that makes sense in terms of your own schedule, the lab’s overall workload, and movement of people in and out of the lab.  I’ve written another post discussing the pros and cons of adoption at different times.

That’s quite a lot to consider, but if the circumstances are right — they don’t need to be perfect of course — the benefits of adopting an ELN for both you and your lab can be substantial, even transformational, and adoption itself is very likely to be a lot easier than you imagined in advance.

What is an electronic lab notebook?

Posted by Rory on July 6th, 2010 @ 9:30 pm

Welcome to the electronic lab notebook blog.  This will be a space for discussing electronic lab notebooks from every angle:  what benefits do they bring? how do they compare with alternatives? what kinds of features do they have and should they have? what issues do people face in using them?  how can you get the most out of them?

In this first post I’m going to start at the beginning:  what is an electronic lab notebook?

Wikipedia defines electronic lab notebook as “a software program designed to replace paper lab notebooks“.  That could be just about anything — beauty is in the eyes of the beholder!   I’ll take a look in a second at who the relevant beholders are and what each of them thinks, but taking wikipedia as the starting point it’s  fair to say first that all of them are looking to move away from this:

Postdocs and graduate students

So who are the relevant beholders?  They can be divided into two categories.  The first is people looking for an electronic note taking device for themselves.  They tend to be interested in convenience and simplicity.  Something which is easy to use and also helps them get organized.     But many postdocs and grad students want something which also provides  support for research.  Here is one description of the ‘dream app’ over on an Apple forum about electronic lab notebooks:

  • easy copy-pasting/drag ‘n drop
  • ability to re-open the files
  • metadata and search (tags, keywords, …)
  • possiblity to link to older notes and graphs
  • store PDF (or TIFF) representation of external files along with the original file: preview files without their originating application
  • automated backup mechanism
  • encryption on disk

The thread following that post contains a good discussion of the varieties of things people want in an electronic lab notebook for their own use, examples of what they have tried, what they like and dislike, and the limitations of the available tools.

PIs

The second category of people looking for an electronic lab notebook want a collaborative tool rather than one aimed at individuals.  They tend to be PIs, or in some cases others in the lab who’ve been asked by the PI to identify a suitable tool. Like those looking for an individual tool, PIs want something which is simple to use and easy to learn.  But beyond that their needs diverge from that of individual scientists. Professor Mike Shipston of the University of Edinburgh provides a good summary of the kinds of challenges that drive PIs to look at adopting an electronic lab notebook:

“We generate a wide variety of types of data sets, for example data from molecular analysis, quantitative analysis, for example quantitative RTPCR, gene cloning, through to electrophysiological analysis, for example from confocal images and total internal reflective microscopy right up to behaviorial assays in animals.  So its really about coordinating those types of data sets that fit together, keeping them contained within projects, because the data sets are derived from different people within the lab.  Also we have a very big extended network both in the UK and across Europe and the US.  It’s about keeping that information together. We have a large number of people coming in and out of the lab, the challenge is keeping track of that data and integrating it in with data from existing projects.”

Well that’s it for this first post — I realize I haven’t yet provided an answer to the question of what an electronic lab notebook is!  The next post is going to look at the tool that has been most widely adopted by labs looking for a collaborative tool, wikis.  I’ll discuss the strengths and limitations of wikis and whether they do – or should – qualify as electronic lab notebooks.  And don’t worry, I promise to come back with a specific answer to the question of what an electronic lab notebook is.